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December 2019

W. Bradford Wilcox, University of Virginia

December 11, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Talking Left, Living Right: Education, Ethnicity & Family Stability in the Golden State

Abstract: California has a reputation as a vanguard for the kinds of progressive values—like expressive individualism, personal fulfillment, and tolerance—associated with the second demographic transition (SDT). The SDT is associated with less marriage and greater family instability, among other things. But it turns out that, when it comes to the practice of family life, California has more intact, married families than the nation as a whole. Why is this? We argue that California has a disproportionate share of Asians and especially immigrants, and these two groups are more likely to embrace a familistic way of life and reject SDT values. We also note that more educated Californians, while they embrace progressive values in theory and in public, are more likely to embrace and live out familistic values in their own private family lives. So, immigrants, Asians, and more educated Californians disproportionately make up the ranks of Californians who are living in intact, married families.

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January 2020

Ken Smith, University of Utah

January 8, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Biodemography of Fertility and Longevity Using the Utah Population Database

Abstarct: There is growing awareness that fertility affects rates of aging, adult survival prospects, and the likelihood of reaching exceptionally old ages. Much of this work, including our own, has focused on women and their ages at last birth, a proposed biodemographic marker for rates of aging. This literature has given far less attention to men, the risk of specific causes of death, the role of early initiation of fertility and how these forces may change over historical time. We use the Utah Population Database to examine how fertility alters adult mortality risks. We give special attention the role of late age at last birth, but also the role of early and late ages first birth Increasing parity is associated with worse survival for women and better for men. This talk will also present the opportunities made possible by the Utah Population Database, a unique resource of 11 million persons comprising genealogies, vital and medical records, as well as demographic and spatial data.

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Pablo Barberá, University of Southern California

January 15, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Does Online Partisan Media Affect Attitudes and Behavior?

Abstract: In today's fragmented online media ecosystem, does exposure to political news through partisan media have a measurable effect on citizens' political attitudes and behavior? Or are these outlets merely preaching to the choir? And if such media effects exist, are they durable and homogeneous across political groups? To answer these questions, we conducted a pre-registered, randomized field experiment embedded in a nationally representative online panel survey. We incentivized participants to temporarily alter features of their information environment during the 2018 U.S. midterm election campaign. Subjects in the treatment groups were asked to change their default browser homepage to either FoxNews.com or HuffPost.com. Using web browsing data collected for our respondents, we find that our intervention exogenously and durably altered news consumption habits. We then evaluate how our treatment affected political attitudes, voting behavior, and civic knowledge, which we measure based on survey responses collected at periodic intervals after our intervention, up to one year later. Our results generally show negligible persuasive and agenda-setting effects, consistent with the minimal media effects hypothesis. However, we uncover a meaningful decrease in overall media trust among those exposed to Fox News and an increase in support for liberal immigration policies among those in the Huffington Post treatment group.

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Hajar Yazdiha, University of Southern California

January 22, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Hajar Yazdiha, University of Southern California

January 22, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Policing, Mental Health, and Racialized Incorporation: Evidence from Muslim American Communities Targeted by CVE Programs

Abstract: Since President Obama’s 2011 strategic plan to counter violent extremism through community partnerships, local law enforcement agencies across the U.S. have implemented community policing programs targeting Muslim American communities with the stated goal of building trust and generating greater information sharing and collaboration. Yet evidence from the ground shows that Muslim Americans’ perceptions of these programs are highly variant, even in jurisdictions with the most celebrated policing practices. More alarmingly, these programs have significant consequences for Muslim Americans’ perceptions of discrimination, mental health, and subsequent pathways of incorporation. This study draws on an analysis of 40 focus groups with 200 Muslim Americans, bringing together insights from theories of criminology, health, and migration to explain how policing patterns divergent perceptions of discrimination and mental health outcomes among Muslim Americans, segmenting pathways of immigrant incorporation.

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Nancy Krieger, Harvard University

January 29, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Structural Racism and the People’s Health: History and Context Matters

Abstract: In this presentation on “Structural racism & the people’s health: history & context matters,” I commence with a brief reminder as to our current societal and ecological context, after which I introduce the ecosocial theory of disease distribution, which guides my work, including conceptualization and measurement of structural injustice. I then offer empirical examples of my research on structural racism and health inequities, in relation to Jim Crow and both past and present residential segregation, as measured using the Index of Concentration at the Extremes for racialized economic segregation and also historical redlining (as delineated by the 1930s federally-sponsored maps produced by the Home Owners Loan Corporation (HOLC)). Health outcomes addressed include: preterm birth; infant mortality; child mortality; cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, and mortality; and breast cancer estrogen receptor status. The presentation concludes with reflections on embodied histories, health inequities, and the people’s health.

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February 2020

David A. Siegel, Duke University

February 5, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Marianne Bertrand, University of Chicago

February 12, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Alyson van Raalte, Max Planck Institute

February 19, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Alyson van Raalte, Max Planck Institute

February 19, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Darrick Hamilton, Ohio State University

February 26, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

March 2020

Jonathan Skinner, Dartmouth University

March 4, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Ellora Derenoncourt, University of California Berkeley

March 11, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Harold A. Pollack, University of Chicago

March 18, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

April 2020

Census 2020: Everyone Counts

April 1, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - April 2, 2020 @ 1:30 pm PDT
TBD

Census 2020: Everyone Counts Sponsored by: UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration, the California Center for Population Research, the Luskin Center for History and Policy, and the California Policy Lab

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Jessica Trounstine, University of California Merced

April 8, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

PAA Practice, UCLA

April 15, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Amani Allen, University of California Berkeley

April 29, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

May 2020

Kate Baldwin, Yale University

May 7, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Ran Abramitzky, Stanford University

May 13, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Margot Kushel, University of California San Francisco

May 20, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Erica Field, Duke University

May 27, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

June 2020

Rob Mare Student Lecture

June 3, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg
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