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April 2019

Leticia Marteleto, UT Austin

April 3, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Live Births and Fertility amidst the Zika Virus Epidemic in Brazil

Abstract: In late 2015, the Brazilian Ministry of Health classified the increase in congenital malformations associated with the Zika Virus (ZIKV) a public health emergency. The risk of ZIKV-related congenital syndrome posed an exogenous threat to reproductive outcomes that could result in declining numbers of live births and potentially fertility. Using 2014-2016 monthly microdata on live births from the Brazilian Information System on Live Births, in this talk I examine live births and fertility trends amidst the ZIKV epidemic in Brazil. Findings suggest a decline in live births that is stratified across socioeconomic status and geographic lines, especially nine months after the call for pregnancy postponement. While declines in total fertility rates were small, fertility trends estimated by age and socioeconomic status suggest important differences in how Zika might have impacted Brazil’s fertility structure. Further findings using monthly data by municipality suggest that the epidemic resulted in a significant decline in fertility even when controlling for characteristics of the municipality. The findings highlight the importance of understanding how exposure to the risk of a health threat directed at fetuses has led to declines in fertility.

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CCPR 2019 PAA Practice Session

April 3, 2019 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Please join us to hear our residents interesting research and give feedback for their upcoming PAA presentations. Presenters: Amanda Gonzalez, "Do You Need to Pay for Quality Care? Exploring Associations Between Bribes and Out-of-Pocket Expenditures on Quality of Labor and Delivery Care in High Volume Public Health Facilities in Uttar Pradesh, India" Mary Robbins, "A Development Dud: Is Microcredit in Bangladesh Actually Improving Women’s Lives? A Case Study in Matlab" Jacob Thomas, "Which Nationalities Have Been Coming the United States…

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Yingchun Ji, Shanghai University

April 17, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Yingchun Ji, Shanghai University Title: TBD More on Prof. Ji

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Jennifer Ahern, UC Berkeley

April 24, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
CCPR Seminar Room, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States

Leveraging big data to assess health effects of changes in physical and social environments, and policy and program implementation

In the era of big data there are opportunities to answer policy-relevant health questions in ways that are timely and cost-efficient. This talk will describe coordination of health data resources for health monitoring and to address questions about the health effects of policies in California. Examples of health effect assessments, including those related to gun shows and the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), will be presented.

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May 2019

Susan Athey, Stanford University

May 1, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
CCPR Seminar Room, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States

Brandon Stewart, Princeton University

May 8, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
CCPR Seminar Room, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States

Pascaline Dupas, Stanford University

May 23, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
CCPR Seminar Room, 4240 Public Affairs Building
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States

The Incidence of Public Subsidies to Private Hospitals under Weak Governance: Evidence from India (joint with Radhika Jain)

Expanding public health insurance and enlisting private agents for service delivery are common policy strategies to meet the goals of universal health coverage, but there is limited evidence from developing countries to inform their design. This paper, joint with Radhika Jain from Harvard School of Public Health, provides quantitative evidence on how insurance design affects program performance and incidence in the context of a government-funded health insurance program that aims to provide free care to 46 million people in Rajasthan, India. We exploit a policy-induced natural experiment, and use administrative claims linked to patient surveys, to provide the first large-scale evidence of private hospital behavior under public health insurance.

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