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January 2020

Christian Dippel, University of California, Los Angeles

January 22, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

The Effect of Land Allotment on Native American Households During the Assimilation Era

Abstract: In the early twentieth century, the U.S. government broke up millions of acres of communally owned reservation lands and allotted them to individual Native American households. Households initially received land allotments with limited property rights (‘in trust’), and were incentivized to prove themselves “competent” in order to obtain full legal title (‘fee simple’) after a set period. Indian allotment thus had elements of a conditional transfer program aimed at assimilation. The policy was ended suddenly in 1934, locking in-trust land into its status in perpetuity. We link land allotment information to the universe of Native American households in the 1940 U.S. Census. We exploit quasi-random variation in being allotted as well as in securing the allotment in fee simple. Obtaining an allotment significantly increased the likelihood of living on a farm but not of working as a farmer, indicating that allottees leased out their land. Allotments also impacted wages and occupational rank. Surprisingly, allotment most significantly impacted educational attainment. We interpret education as a way of signalling “competency” to government agents. Obtaining the land in fee simple was associated with decreased likelihood of living on a farm and owning one’s home, evidence that many allottees sold their land once they were deemed competent and obtained title. The fee-simple effects were more pronounced within tribes whose ancestral tribal norms emphasized private over communal property, indicating a cultural determinant in how the wealth transfer was utilized. Consistent with this, households in tribes with traditions of private property also engaged in more signalling of their assimilation.

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Nancy Krieger, Harvard University

January 29, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Structural Racism and the People’s Health: History and Context Matters

Abstract: In this presentation on “Structural racism & the people’s health: history & context matters,” I commence with a brief reminder as to our current societal and ecological context, after which I introduce the ecosocial theory of disease distribution, which guides my work, including conceptualization and measurement of structural injustice. I then offer empirical examples of my research on structural racism and health inequities, in relation to Jim Crow and both past and present residential segregation, as measured using the Index of Concentration at the Extremes for racialized economic segregation and also historical redlining (as delineated by the 1930s federally-sponsored maps produced by the Home Owners Loan Corporation (HOLC)). Health outcomes addressed include: preterm birth; infant mortality; child mortality; cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, and mortality; and breast cancer estrogen receptor status. The presentation concludes with reflections on embodied histories, health inequities, and the people’s health.

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February 2020

David A. Siegel, Duke University

February 5, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

A Theoretically-driven Approach to Measurement

Abstract: Item Response Theory (IRT) models are widely used in political science as a dimensional-reduction technique: they reduce variation in multiple variables to continuous variation along one or more latent dimensions. One-dimensional IRT models have a conceptual advantage in doing so in that the latent dimension they identify has intrinsic conceptual meaning, e.g., a student's latent level of knowledge of the subject matter on an exam. That advantage dissipates when there is more than one latent dimension, however. When there are multiple latent dimensions, their meanings are typically assigned post-analysis, leading to potential bias in their assignment and a lack of reliability across data sources. We propose, detail, and validate on both simulated and real data a supervised approach employing Bayesian Item Response Theory on multiple latent dimensions and binary data. Our approach yields conceptually meaningful latent dimensions that are reliable across different data sources without additional exogenous assumptions. We focus on applications that employ extant survey data to make theoretically-meaningful measurements of concepts that are potentially different from what the survey was originally intended to measure. Our approach has applications to everything from conflict prediction to the assessment of psychological traits.

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Alyson van Raalte, Max Planck Institute

February 19, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Beyond Life Expectancy—The Case for Monitoring Lifespan Variation

Abstract: Human population health is generally monitored by average mortality levels, typically in terms of life expectancies or age-standardized death rates, which belie substantial variation in length of life. Variation in ages at death, captured by a metric of lifespan variation, should be used to supplement measures of average longevity when comparing or monitoring societies and population subgroups. Although lifespan variation has historically been strongly inversely correlated with life expectancy, we are beginning to see this relationship reversed, resulting in positive correlation in some countries or subnational populations. Often these changes reflect midlife mortality crises with roots in stratified education and wealth. In this talk I will present empirical examples from around the developed world, pressing the case to monitor lifespan variation.

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Darrick Hamilton, Ohio State University

February 26, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

March 2020

Jonathan Skinner, Dartmouth University

March 4, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PST
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Ellora Derenoncourt, University of California Berkeley

March 11, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Harold A. Pollack, University of Chicago

March 18, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

April 2020

Census 2020: Everyone Counts

April 2, 2020 @ 1:00 pm - April 3, 2020 @ 6:00 pm PDT
TBD

Census 2020: Everyone Counts Sponsored by: UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration, the California Center for Population Research, the Luskin Center for History and Policy, and the California Policy Lab

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Jessica Trounstine, University of California Merced

April 8, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

PAA Practice, UCLA

April 15, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Amani Allen, University of California Berkeley

April 29, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

May 2020

Kate Baldwin, Yale University

May 7, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Ran Abramitzky, Stanford University

May 13, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Margot Kushel, University of California San Francisco

May 20, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

Erica Field, Duke University

May 27, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg

June 2020

Rob Mare Student Lecture

June 3, 2020 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm PDT
4240 Public Affairs Bldg
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